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zen perfect » Blog Archive » Computer Science vs Programming (Software Engineering)

Published July 31, 2011 by tweetingdonal

Computer Science vs Programming (Software Engineering)

People often get these two confused since they overlap in many fields. You tell someone your major is Computer Science and they think that you’re a programmer. While that is true quite often, the concepts of computer science do not deal directly with code, but with the math and logic behind it. Software engineering, on the other hand, is your more typical concept of the computer programmer, who works on implementing ideas into software. I thought I’d do both of these fields justice by clarifying the difference.

First of all, I would like to clarify that web design or knowing how to use Photoshop is irrelevant to both of these fields. If you tell a non-techie that you major in computer science, they might ask you to make a website. This often works because people who work with computers are often tech-savvy and web design is relatively easy to pick up. However, beautiful websites are usually created by art majors, not engineers.

Software engineers write code. That is what they do. They are well versed with the programming languages and given a task to code, they will do so. They can convert human language into a computer language. This is who you hire when you want to develop a commercial piece of software. Software engineers can also write web applications because the coding procedure is more or less the same. In a sense, computer programmers do the brute work. This sounds crude but they are the ones who implement a given task. A pure programmer does not study algorithms but the available methods and practices to develop and maintain software.

Computer science is the study of discrete mathematics and the theory behind solving problems, often in code. Computer science is a lot more broad in the amount of material it covers. Anything that deals with solving problems in an algorithmic process is computer science and thus is often written as code because of its step-by-step procedures. That is why computer science branches a lot into discrete mathematics. Computer science, in fact, does not require computers. It is the theory involving the processing and handling of data in different ways. This includes algorithm analysis, computational sciences, data structures, parallel computing, artifical intelligence, and so on.

Pure computer science is very research oriented and may not even have commercial applications. Computer science is more theoretical and requires more problem solving. You will not learn all the programming languages out there, but instead how to prove equations and make algorithms more efficient. You will learn various data structures and how to set various problems into mathematical equations.

The reason these two fields are so often confused is that most computer scientists are well versed in programming and can take on software engineering tasks. Many people do so because software engineering is more commercial and practical while with computer science, you may be solving problems that have never been solved before.

I see many programmer job postings require at least a bachelor degree in computer science. From one aspect, I disagree with this. A computer science major is overkill for a pure programmer in terms of theoretical knowledge. However, from another aspect, I agree with this because a computer science degree shows that the programmer will think deeper beyond the superficial process of making a piece of code work.

Both majors are very important and almost no one stays 100% within their field but instead in an overlap of many fields. However, hopefully the next time you hear the term “computer science” and “computer programming,” you will see them in different ways :)

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I found this write up and liked it. I’ll be trimming it down to be part of a definitions page for one of my blogs, but I think Paul did an excellent job of sorting out the differences and definitely deserves credit for his observations 🙂

McConnell-Reid Debt Ceiling Fail Safe Option Hanging By A Thread

Published July 21, 2011 by tweetingdonal

WASHINGTON — The fail-safe debt ceiling plan crafted by the Senate’s top two leaders, Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) – is close to being put on political life support, those familiar with negotiations tell The Huffington Post, as lawmakers coalesce around a major deal instead.

Sources on the Hill Thursday morning expressed a newfound — at times defeatist — sense of worry about the political prospects of the proposal, which would cut roughly $1.5 trillion over ten years while granting authority to the president to suggest (but not sign off on) future spending cuts as a condition of raising the debt ceiling now. House Republicans have told leadership that they are sour on the idea, with more than 90 members pledging to oppose it. Another factor contributing toward its demise, however, has been the Obama administration’s decision to continue to push for a bigger deficit-reduction package, which has led many lawmakers to consider the McConnell-Reid option both insufficient and potentially unnecessary.

“I think it is certainly an uphill battle now,” a Hill Democrat said of the McConnell-Reid plan.

“We did not leave the [White House] meeting yesterday feeling like there was a clear path moving forward,” said another Democratic congressional aide. “People are being drawn towards other solutions at the moment. But they are mirages.”

Or perhaps not. On Thursday afternoon, a report surfaced that Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio)’s office and the Obama administration were close to a major deal to resolve the debt ceiling standoff.

On Wednesday evening, the president and his team had separate meetings with congressional Democratic and Republican leadership to chart out a way forward on the debt ceiling deal. The administration pressed, as it has in the past, for lawmakers to coalesce around as big a deficit reduction package as politically possible. There are conflicting reports as to what was discussed. But according to multiple sources from both parties, the administration signaled a willingness to tackle a bigger plan than even that proposed by the bipartisan Gang of Six.

What such a deal would look like is difficult to pin down in detail, as much of the Gang of Six proposal requires congressional committees to write in the specific cuts to programs under their purview. But it would involve steep reductions in health care spending — both in Medicare and Medicaid. In previous debt ceiling negotiations, the administration has supported further means-testing elements of Medicare as well as raising the eligibility age of the program. Cuts to Medicare suppliers would also be part of a larger package, as would adjusting the payment structure of Social Security so that a lower level of benefits was paid out over time.

 

Adam Sarvana

Communications Director

U. S. Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva  (AZ-07)

(202) 225-2435 office

(202) 573-2562 cell

House “Gang of 70-Plus” to Senate “Gang of Six”: We Outnumber Your Plan to Slash Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security

Published July 19, 2011 by tweetingdonal

Unknownname

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 19, 2011

Press Contact: Adam Sarvana (202) 225-2435

                                                 (202) 573-2562 cell

 

House “Gang of 70-Plus” to Senate “Gang of Six”: We Outnumber Your Plan to Slash Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security

 

Washington, D.C. – Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) co-chair Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva today released the following statement on the Senate “Gang of Six” budget proposal:

 

“This terrible plan could cut Medicare and Medicaid to unsustainably low levels and put seniors’ well-being at risk. Anyone who wants to pass it through Congress should remember that more than 70 House Democrats have already pledged their opposition, and more are signing on every day. The letter we sent to Leader Pelosi July 8 vowing to oppose any cuts to Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid as part of these budget negotiations has become a growing wave of House resolve to protect these programs. We’re keeping it open for more signatures, and our Gang of 70-plus has the ‘Gang of Six’ completely outnumbered. Newly minted Rep. Janice Hahn signed on as one of her first official acts as a Congresswoman – that’s how quickly it’s picking up momentum.

 

Republicans have already said they won’t vote for any package, period, because of their opposition to a functional economy. House Democrats hold the key to whatever plan can pass Congress. That’s why the Senate ‘Gang of Six’ proposal is dead on arrival. Instead of toying with ways to slash vital programs in just such a way as to make different budget numbers align on paper, Congress and the White House should follow the path of our People’s Budget: creating jobs, protecting Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, ending corporate subsidies and millionaire tax giveaways, and ensuring our economy works for everyone rather than a greedy few.”

 

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Peacelike mongoose

Published July 13, 2011 by tweetingdonal

The Peacelike Mongoose

by James Thurber

In cobra country a mongoose was born one day who didn’t want to fight cobras or anything else. The word spread from mongoose to mongoose that there was a mongoose who didn’t want to fight cobras. If he didn’t want to fight anything else, it was his own business, but it was the duty of every mongoose to kill cobras or be killed by cobras.
“Why?” asked the peacelike mongoose, and the word went around that the strange new mongoose was not only pro-cobra and anti-mongoose but intellectually curious and against the ideals and traditions of mongooism.
“He is crazy,” cried the young mongoose’s father.
“He is sick,” said his mother.
“He is a coward,” shouted his brothers.
“He is a mongoosexual,” whispered his sisters.
Strangers who had never laid eyes on the peacelike mongoose remembered that they had seen him crawling on his stomach, or trying on cobra hoods, or plotting the violent overthrow of Mongoosia.
“I am trying to use reason and intelligence,” said the strange new mongoose.
“Reason is six-sevenths of treason,” said one of his neighbors.
“Intelligence is what the enemy uses,” said another.
Finally, the rumor spread that the mongoose had venom in his sting, like a cobra, and he was tried, convicted by a show of paws, and condemned to banishment.

Moral: Ashes to ashes, and clay to clay, if the enemy doesn’t get you your own folks may.

Amazing that I cannot recall ever hearing this fable. It is truly appropriate!

Peacelike mongoose

Published July 13, 2011 by tweetingdonal

The Peacelike Mongoose

by James Thurber

In cobra country a mongoose was born one day who didn’t want to fight cobras or anything else. The word spread from mongoose to mongoose that there was a mongoose who didn’t want to fight cobras. If he didn’t want to fight anything else, it was his own business, but it was the duty of every mongoose to kill cobras or be killed by cobras.
“Why?” asked the peacelike mongoose, and the word went around that the strange new mongoose was not only pro-cobra and anti-mongoose but intellectually curious and against the ideals and traditions of mongooism.
“He is crazy,” cried the young mongoose’s father.
“He is sick,” said his mother.
“He is a coward,” shouted his brothers.
“He is a mongoosexual,” whispered his sisters.
Strangers who had never laid eyes on the peacelike mongoose remembered that they had seen him crawling on his stomach, or trying on cobra hoods, or plotting the violent overthrow of Mongoosia.
“I am trying to use reason and intelligence,” said the strange new mongoose.
“Reason is six-sevenths of treason,” said one of his neighbors.
“Intelligence is what the enemy uses,” said another.
Finally, the rumor spread that the mongoose had venom in his sting, like a cobra, and he was tried, convicted by a show of paws, and condemned to banishment.

Moral: Ashes to ashes, and clay to clay, if the enemy doesn’t get you your own folks may.

Amazing that I cannot recall ever hearing this fable. It is truly appropriate!

Peacelike mongoose

Published July 13, 2011 by tweetingdonal

The Peacelike Mongoose

by James Thurber

In cobra country a mongoose was born one day who didn’t want to fight cobras or anything else. The word spread from mongoose to mongoose that there was a mongoose who didn’t want to fight cobras. If he didn’t want to fight anything else, it was his own business, but it was the duty of every mongoose to kill cobras or be killed by cobras.
“Why?” asked the peacelike mongoose, and the word went around that the strange new mongoose was not only pro-cobra and anti-mongoose but intellectually curious and against the ideals and traditions of mongooism.
“He is crazy,” cried the young mongoose’s father.
“He is sick,” said his mother.
“He is a coward,” shouted his brothers.
“He is a mongoosexual,” whispered his sisters.
Strangers who had never laid eyes on the peacelike mongoose remembered that they had seen him crawling on his stomach, or trying on cobra hoods, or plotting the violent overthrow of Mongoosia.
“I am trying to use reason and intelligence,” said the strange new mongoose.
“Reason is six-sevenths of treason,” said one of his neighbors.
“Intelligence is what the enemy uses,” said another.
Finally, the rumor spread that the mongoose had venom in his sting, like a cobra, and he was tried, convicted by a show of paws, and condemned to banishment.

Moral: Ashes to ashes, and clay to clay, if the enemy doesn’t get you your own folks may.

Amazing that I cannot recall ever hearing this fable. It is truly appropriate!

Peacelike mongoose

Published July 13, 2011 by tweetingdonal

The Peacelike Mongoose

by James Thurber

In cobra country a mongoose was born one day who didn’t want to fight cobras or anything else. The word spread from mongoose to mongoose that there was a mongoose who didn’t want to fight cobras. If he didn’t want to fight anything else, it was his own business, but it was the duty of every mongoose to kill cobras or be killed by cobras.
“Why?” asked the peacelike mongoose, and the word went around that the strange new mongoose was not only pro-cobra and anti-mongoose but intellectually curious and against the ideals and traditions of mongooism.
“He is crazy,” cried the young mongoose’s father.
“He is sick,” said his mother.
“He is a coward,” shouted his brothers.
“He is a mongoosexual,” whispered his sisters.
Strangers who had never laid eyes on the peacelike mongoose remembered that they had seen him crawling on his stomach, or trying on cobra hoods, or plotting the violent overthrow of Mongoosia.
“I am trying to use reason and intelligence,” said the strange new mongoose.
“Reason is six-sevenths of treason,” said one of his neighbors.
“Intelligence is what the enemy uses,” said another.
Finally, the rumor spread that the mongoose had venom in his sting, like a cobra, and he was tried, convicted by a show of paws, and condemned to banishment.

Moral: Ashes to ashes, and clay to clay, if the enemy doesn’t get you your own folks may.

Amazing that I cannot recall ever hearing this fable. It is truly appropriate!